PlayStation Leaked Data Suggests Remasters Sell Incredibly Well

Expect Even More Remasters From PlayStation!

Story Highlights
  • A leaked slide from PlayStation illustrates the difference in buying trends between new titles and remasters.
  • The data shows early adopters quickly purchase remastered titles during the initial launch period.
  • On the other hand, new releases take their time to get going, experiencing a major surge in sales during discounts and promotions.

Recently leaked Insomniac data has already revealed a lot about PlayStation’s plans, including potential budget cuts for Spider-Man 3, the length of Marvel’s Wolverine, and more.

One of the newer slides from the leak shows PlayStation’s first-party remastered games are in high demand, selling much better than initially expected.

Why it matters: The data highlights why companies continue to invest in remasters and sometimes focus on older games more than creating new IPs.

As shared by Twitter user FunkyClam, the leaked graph shows that most remastered editions heavily rely on early adopters who prefer to purchase games at full retail price.

This directly benefits PlayStation since such buyers don’t wait for discounts or reviews, likely meaning that the appeal of a nostalgic classic coming back is enough to lure them into a purchase.

A similar trend has not been observed for newer titles. While a game like Spider-Man 3 sold 2.5 million units at release, previous data suggests the game will see its biggest sales boost once a few discounts are put in place.

Remasters are not a new trend, but they have become increasingly popular since the 8th generation of consoles. Since the PS4 and Xbox One launched without backward compatibility, consumers became accustomed to rebuying games from older hardware.

Sony, in particular, has been successful with this approach since the PS3 is extremely difficult to emulate.

Marvel's Spider-Man 2

The graph also mentions games named “Game 4” and “Game 5.” These are likely to be third-party titles, but they showcase similar results.

This gives us enough insights to understand why Sony has been releasing so many remastered games. Naughty Dog seems to be the biggest first-party studio impacted by this decision, focusing on releasing remasters and remakes.

A credible leaker has also stated that Sony is working on remasters of the God of War trilogy for new PlayStation consoles. Therefore, this remaster will likely sell like hotcakes if it comes to fruition.

With AAA gaming becoming increasingly challenging for publishers and developers, fans should expect more remasters moving forward. Not only are these projects easier for studios to produce, but they are also guaranteed to succeed in most cases.

For PlayStation, the console manufacturer has a slew of games in its backlog that can revisited. The likes of Sly Cooper, Jak and Daxter, Motorstorm, and more are among the few IPs that have not received new entries in many years.

Fans have also shown plenty of interest in Bloodborne, presenting numerous opportunities for PlayStation to remaster games to capitalize on this demand.

Latest News

Follow Us

104,000FansLike
32,122FollowersFollow

Trending

FromSoftware Can Release Games So Quickly Due To Efficient Staff

The FromSoftware director elaborated on the success behind the studio's recent output, giving credit to the team for its efficiency.

EA’s Canceled Star Wars Mandalorian Featured Fast-Paced Combat Like Doom

Following EA's decision to cancel Respawn Entertainment's Mandalorian game, new details about the project have emerged.

Horizon Forbidden West Studio Lost 10% of Developers In Recent Layoffs

The Horizon Forbidden West developer, Guerrilla Games, was affected by the recent layoffs, and it lost 10% of its employees.

PS5 Continues Selling Faster Than PS4; Sales Ahead 7% in 39 Months

According to Circana, the PS5 is now tracking ahead of the PS4 when comparing sales for the first 39 months of both console's lifecycles.

PS VR2 In Limbo As PlayStation Gives Up On VR In Just 1 Year

The lack of games available for the PSVR2 suggests PlayStation has given up on the headset just a year after it was released.