Introduction

Thermaltake Technology Inc. was founded in 1999 with the vision of building Thermaltake Technology into “a cultural brand for the enjoyment of entertainment, e-Sports, technology, and lifestyle”. Thermaltake Technology is focused on delivering the perfect user experience. Their products range from Power Supply Units, PC Chassis, Complete Custom Loop solutions, CPU Coolers, Fans to the range of the peripherals like keyboards, mouse, mouse mat, headphones, and even gaming chairs. The very essence of the Thermaltake DNA is based on Courage, Passion, and Perseverance. They are diversified in brands like TteSPORTS, Luxa to bring consumer-focused products from respective domains.

During the Computex 2018, Thermaltake introduced their new family of PC Chassis named Level 20 which quickly gained the attention of masses. Almost every form of chassis was covered in the lineup including the microATX, mini-ITX, Mid Tower, Full Tower to the extreme end which is labeled as simply Level 20. Their naming convention goes like Level 20 GT, XT, VT, etc. Given that the new series was almost covering every segment of the market, there was a need to cover the budget segment as well. This is where Thermaltake introduced Level 20 MT ARGB where ARGB signifies the addressable RGB fans which have been included in the Chassis to give some perspective to it. As it stands the Level 20 MT ARGB falls in the family of the TT premium chassis Level 20 but its cost-effectiveness along with 2x tempered glass and 3 ARGB fans is something making this chassis to target the large market segment.

The Thermaltake Level 20 MT ARGB is effectively a mid-tower chassis that can support up to standard ATX size motherboards. It has 7 PCIe slot covers with the maximum supported length for a graphics card of 366mm without radiator on the front side. The CPU cooler’s height clearance is 170mm. PSU length clearance is 170mm. It comes with 3x ARGB 120mm fans on the front with a dedicated controller which has its own Cons as we shall see in the content. The lighting can be controlled using a dedicated button on the I/O panel as well as it can be synced with the motherboard’s lighting solution. Though this is a nice feature but the main limitation is that the user can’t control the fan’s speed. A non-RGB 120mm fan is on the rear with up to two 120/140mm fans support on the top. As is the case with the recent Thermaltake Chassis designs, the Thermaltake Level 20 MT ARGB has a vented side located on the right side of the motherboard tray. The user can install up to 240mm radiator here. Thermaltake Level 20 MT ARGB has PSU shroud and this is where it resembles Fractal Design R series chassis. The shroud has vented design on the top with a provision to install two 120mm fans on it. In terms of the storage capacity, the user can install up to 4x 2.5” or 2x 3.5” drives or a combination. The HDD cage is not tool less. Clearly, Thermaltake has done some compromises in the design aspect to drive the overall pricing down to budget-friendly. There is a 4mm thick TG panel on the front and the side panel is also 4mm thick. Though the chassis has the sturdy build quality and some nice features but there are many gray areas that may overshadow the features. We will cover them in the closer look section.

  • Product:               Level 20 MT ARGB
  • Manufacturer:      Thermaltake
  • Price:                    Rs.11,500/- [When it will be released in Pakistan]

Specifications

Packaging and Unboxing

The Thermaltake Level 20 MT ARGB is shipped inside a cardboard box finished in the black color theme. This goes to show their TT premium branding and packaging.

The front and the rear sides are identical in layout. TT premium brand logo is printed on the top left side. There is a picture of the chassis showing the addressable RGB lighting solution. Level 20 MT ARGB is printed at the bottom left side. ARGB lighting compatibility with motherboard manufacturers’ onboard lighting solution is printed on the bottom right side. The top right side indicates that the chassis has 2x 4mm thick tempered glass panels.

This side of the Thermaltake Level 20 MT ARGB packaging box has TT premium brand logo printed on the top left side. Fragile warning sticker is pasted on the top right side as the chassis has 2x tempered glass panels. Level 20 MT ARGB is printed right below the cutout to carry the box. The lower section showcases the 27 illumination modes using a single button on the I/O panel. There are multiple stickers at the bottom showing the Part No, EAN, UPC, Serial No, etc information. The chassis is made in China.

This side has a TT premium brand logo printed on the top left side. Fragile sticker is pasted on the top right side. The specifications of the chassis are printed in the tabular format on the main section.

Opening the box will show the chassis wrapped inside transparent sheet and tucked between the two Styrofoam pads in the white color. The front side of the chassis is facing up.

Contents

These include:

  • Various screws to install motherboard, PSU, storage drives, fan
  • User Guide
  • Cable Ties
  • Standoff with tightening tool
  • Warranty Manual
  • TT Premium sticker
  • 2x Lighting Sync Cables
  • Speaker
  • Rubber mounts for storage drives

Closer Look

The Thermaltake Level 20 MT ARGB is a mid-tower having a dimension of 455x204x71mm with a net weight of 6.75KG. Its main frame is made of SPCC material and it features two TG panels as well. The exterior and interior are finished in black color. Before digging into the design elements of the chassis, let’s take a look at what Thermaltake is saying about it. “Thermaltake Level 20 MT ARGB is the premium mid tower synchronized with the motherboard in the level 20 family. Level 20 MT ARGB features enlarged side panel window, ATX motherboard support, and a power cover. The Level 20 MT ARGB comes preinstalled with three 120mm 5V ARGB LED front fans and one 120mm rear fan. The front fans are addressable to deliver 16.8 million-color RGB illumination and unparalleled ventilation. This model comes ready to sync with RGB capable motherboards from Asus, Gigabyte, MSI, and ASRock. The Level 20 MT ARGB takes our latest case innovations and wraps them in an ultra-modern style that’s utterly unique in the case market today. Stand out from the crowd with Level 20.”

Let’s start with the front side.

The front side of the Thermaltake Level 20 MT ARGB is one heck of a spectacular view. We have two silver rounded angular sides that make you think they are brushes aluminum which they are not. There is a 4mm thick tempered glass side panel covering the 3x ARGB 120mm fans. While this is a spectacular site indeed, there are multiple design drawbacks here. Looking closely you will see that the TG panel is installed in an offset design with the right side having a more vented area (though still less by any standard) as compared to the left side vented area. This design will make you think that this is an intake area on the front panel. There is a less than 3mm or so gap between the glass panel and the fans themselves. This is also an air intake area and surprisingly it is not filtered whereas those narrow vented sides have dust filters on them. I am not sure what those narrow dust filters are supposed to do when more than 360mm of space is uncovered! Another design drawback is that the TG panel in installed using two dual-sided adhesive tapes and panel can easily fell off. In fact, in my case, it indeed gets loose from the top side and fell off though I was lucky enough to catch it while it was mid-air otherwise it would have been shattered. Mind you this is when the chassis was in the ambient of 42°C which could have an effect on the adhesive tape. There is a TT premium brand logo and name at the bottom of the TG panel. Speaking of the fans, with such restrictive airflow design, there was a need to install high static pressure fans but these stock fans are not high static pressure optimized as our thermal testing has suggested.

The front panel is removable. To remove it, hold the panel at its bottom side and pull it off. It will take some force and this force can also loosen the TG panel. The above picture shows the inside of the front panel.

The above picture is zoomed in to show you how narrow these vents are and dust filters covering these narrow vents. There is no dust filter right behind the glass panel to cover the possibly largest air intake position on the front.

Let’s take a look at the main front side with the front panel removed. We can see three 120mm fans on the front. These are ARGB fans meaning they feature addressable RGB lighting. The front side can only house up to 3x 120mm fans and up to 360mm radiator. There is no support for 140mm sizing on the front side. The I/O panel on the top is removable as can be seen in the picture. There are two cutouts on the right side to pass the cables through though Thermaltake is not using them as all the cables of the fans are passed through from the top side.

Let’s take a look at the rear side of the Thermaltake Level 20 MT ARGB.

There is a large size cutout for the motherboard’s rear I/O shield. On its right side, we have vented portion for the 120mm size fan (pre-installed). Please, note that we can’t adjust the height of the fan. In the middle, we have 7 PCIe slots with vented covers. Area to its next is solid design without any vents. At the bottom, we have a standard ATX PSU mount. As can be seen, both side panels are secured using screws which are not thumb screws but have bulky heads and they are not captive either. The middle side of these panels suggests that they are to be slided out.

Let’s take a look at the bottom side of the Thermaltake Level 20 MT ARGB:

We can spot 4 circular large size feet of the chassis at the bottom with the rubber mounts at their end to avoid scratching the surface on which the chassis will be placed. There is a non-magnetic dust filter on the PSU mount. While this dust filter is easy to remove, it is not that easy to install! It is washable.

The above picture shows the dust filter removed. The vented PSU mount is now fully exposed.

On the right side at the bottom, we can spot 4 screws. These are holding the drive cage of the chassis. The drive cage can be removed to make space for the PSU cables. The user is supposed to remove these 4x screws and 4x screws on the top side of the PSU shroud.

The far right side at the bottom of the chassis has a large cutout which is another air intake side for the front. This is also where you will place your fingers of the hand to have some grip while removing the front panel.

Let’s take a look at the top side of the Thermaltake Level 20 MT ARGB

The top side of the Thermaltake Level 20 MT ARGB has I/O panel on its leftmost side which is designed in a way that it is independent of the top side’s frame hence can be removed. There is a magnetic dust filter covering the 120/140mm fan mounts.

The above picture shows the top side with a magnetic dust filter removed. The fans can be adjusted as Thermaltake has provided rail system to slide the fans for flexible mounting.

Let’s take a look at both side panels of the chassis from the exterior.

The side panel features 4mm thick tempered glass. It is installed using two screws at the rear side of the chassis. The top and bottom frames of the chassis are bit protruded to rest the panel in between them. When the screws are removed the panel does not fall off and it slides out a bit on the front side’s axis giving the impression that it might be hinged which it is not.

This is a design element and Thermaltake has done a nice job in the handling of the panel. There is a blue sticker warning the user that the TG panel is on.

The right side panel is a solid body except that there is a vented portion on the left side. It has a magnetic dust filter from the inside. This is the area where the user can install up to 2x 120mm fans or 240mm radiator on the inside. This side can also be taken as air intake side.

The above picture shows the inner side of the panel with a magnetic dust filter removed from the vented portion to show them both.

The top I/O panel includes:

  • RGB Switch
  • Headphone jack
  • Microphone jack
  • 2x USB 3.0 ports
  • Reset button
  • LED Indicator
  • Power button

Now that we have discussed the exterior of the Thermaltake Level 20 MT ARGB, it is time to take a look at the interior and see what bells and whistles it has.

The above picture shows the inner side of the chassis in totality. This is a compact mid tower but space is judicially utilized except the top which has been remedied by giving the front side for housing the AIO. We have a solid motherboard tray with no flex. There is a large cutout on the motherboard tray for ease of CPU cooler installation. For cable passing, there are three cutouts on the right side of the tray as well as two more cutouts further to the three cutouts. All of these don’t have rubber grommets. There are two more cutouts on the top of the tray to pass EPS cable and other cables like fan’s power and LED cable. 9x standoff are pre-installed which is thankfully a right decision.

The Thermaltake Level 20 MT ARGB comes with one 120mm fan (non-RGB) at the rear making the total count of 4x preinstalled fans. The rear fan has 7 blades and has a 3-pin power cable which the user needs to plug into the power source like fan header on the motherboard or directly to the PSU. The user can install a 120mm radiator on the rear though it seems like only a slim rad would fit. Alternately, this fan can be connected the switchboard on the backside of the chassis as that has one 3-pin header on it, not in use.

The Thermaltake Level 20 MT ARGB has 7 PCIe slots with vented and reusable/removable slot covers. Surprisingly, they did not use the thumb screws on these slots.

There is a provision to install up to 2x 120/140mm size fans on the top side of the chassis. There is less than 28mm of displacement from the top side to the motherboard’s top. Say bye bye to installing any AIO up top. The only possible positions for the AIO are the vented side on the motherboard tray which can only house up to 240mm AIO or the front side which can house up to 360mm AIO but with restrictive air flow. The top side can only be used for the fans.

The above picture shows the vented side inside the chassis marked with the red color lining finished in honeycomb design. This is where the user can install up to 2x 120mm fans or 240mm radiator/AIO. This side has proper dust filter on its rear hence can be used as intake if using fans or exhaust if using radiator depending upon the user’s requirement and configuration.

There is a cutout on the top side of this vented area from where the system cables have been routed towards the rear side.

Taking a peek on the front side from inside of the chassis we can see the backside of the 3x 120mm ARGB fans. The fans’ height can be adjusted. There is a gap between the front rail and the PSU shroud which is not covered. This gap is approximately 57mm from tip to tip. This is the critical information if you are looking for what thickness of the radiators it can house.

The above picture shows the info label on the front mounted fan. It is using DC Brushless motor at 12V using 0.30Amp.

The above picture shows the top side of the PSU shroud. We have a 2.5” drive bracket pre-installed on the right side of the shroud. This placement is a wise move given its location from the cable management perspective. The main section of the shroud is vented and looking closely one can spot mounting positions for 2x 120mm size fans. Now, this is an interesting perspective. Having two fans throwing air on the graphics card is definitely a good idea but the question remains at large where do these fans would draw the fresh air? The bottom side of the chassis is a closed design with the only vented area located on the PSU mount. This area will be blocked once the PSU will be installed leaving no room for these two fans (if installed) to draw fresh air. There are three cutouts on the shroud’s top located closer to the motherboard side which is really nice to have. None of these has rubber grommets. The 2.5” bracket is secured using a thumb screw and can be easily taken out.

The above picture shows the 4x screws with flat heads on the shroud’s top side. These 4 are to be removed in addition to the bottom mounted 4x screws if the drive cage is to be removed.

The above picture shows the PSU shroud from its side. We can spot a large size cutout on the left side to showcase the PSU branding. The overall look and feel of the design from this very angle give a resemblance to the Fractal Design R series cases. As can be seen, the shroud runs to the entire length of the chassis.

Let’s take a look at the chassis from the backside with the panel removed.

There is a total of 16 cable tie points. There is another 2.5” drive bracket right below the CPU cutout hole behind the motherboard tray. The RGB switchboard is installed on the left side behind the vented side. Looking closely you will see that it is covering a certain portion of the top cutout from which the 24-pin ATX cable is supposed to be routed through. Again, we are seeing a design overlook. One option is to remove the board and pass the cable followed by installing the board again but that sounds cumbersome and inconvenient from the user’s perspective. All the cables are managed on the center lining of the chassis. There is another drawback here as the total workspace for cable management is less than that of approximately 12mm or so depending upon the location. Be careful if you are routing the cables such as they are bundled in a group on the center which actually looks pleasing but in this case, you will find a hard time closing the side panel. There is no inset in the panel hence zero support is coming from the panel itself to hold some cables bulk in it. To showcase this point, I did cable management exactly the way that would obstruct the panel. You can see that later in the section.

Let’s take a look at the bottom chamber.

The bottom chamber has a length of approximately 420mm. the spacing between the drive cage and the right side is approximately 240mm. Installing the 170mm length PSU would leave 70mm or so spacing for the PSU cables which is not enough.

The PSU mount does not have anti-vibration rubber pads on the tabs that are supposed to hold the PSU. I am wondering how much cost would Thermaltake have saved in doing that! The PSU is slided in from the side and secured using 4x screws from the rear side.

As mentioned above that the drive cage is not tool-less. There are two steel caddies without any anti-vibration padding. Each is secured to the frame of the cage using two thumb screws. Each caddy can hold up to 1x 2.5” or 3.5” drive.

The drive cage consists of two brackets that are installed in parallel to each other vertically using 4x screws per bracket. I have covered those screws locations above. This design element reminds me of the similar system in the Phanteks Evolv ATX though the finish quality of the Evolv is too good plus its caddies are tool-less.

The above picture shows the bottom chamber with drive cage removed.

The above picture shows the system panel cables’ connectors.

This is yet again another chassis from the Thermaltake with the RGB fans coming with proprietary cables and switchboard rendering the fans unusable without the controller. The 5V switchboard has black color PCB with three 6-pin connectors. Each connector has fan power and LED power cable combined into a single unit. There is also a 3-pin fan header to which the rear fan’s power cable can be connected as our sample does not have the rear fan connected to this header. This board uses SATA connector to take power. There is a white color connector at the bottom labeled as LED out.

This is where the either of two bundled ARGB sync cables is to be connected while the cable’s other end will be connected to the motherboard’s 5V lighting header like AURA Sync header on the Asus motherboard. Since the Gigabyte motherboards use 4-pin style interface, Thermaltake has bundled 4-pin lighting sync cable as well. The lighting solution is compatible with Asus AURA Sync, ASRock Polychrome, Gigabyte RGB Fusion, and MSI Mystic Light Sync. To convert the control to the motherboard, press and hold the RGB switch on the top I/O panel for a few seconds after connecting the lighting sync cable.

Here is the complete listing of fan and radiator support as can be seen in the picture below.

Test Build and Experience

The following configuration has been used for the test build:

  • Intel i7 8700k
  • Asus Strix Z390E Gaming
  • Ballistix 16GB @ 3000MHz DDR4
  • Noctua NH-U12A
  • Sapphire Nitro+ RX 580 8G
  • Thermaltake TP RGB 750W PSU
  • Samsung PM961 250GB SSD

I started with the motherboard installation and did not face any issue regarding the motherboard installation. The cooler and RAM were installed outside of the chassis though they can be easily installed after the motherboard’s installation. I must say the installation was a convenient job with the Thermaltake Level 20 MT ARGB. Next, the PSU was installed. It is important to install the PSU first before routing the system panel cables. Since the PSU is fully modular, only the needed cables were used (24-pin ATX, 8+8-pin PEG, 8-pin EPS, and SATA). I have faced the difficulties connecting the EPS cable with the air cooler installed. So, take note and connect the EPS cable before installing the air cooler. This should not be an issue with the AIO. The RGB switchboard is covering the top portion of the cutout from where the 24-pin ATX cable is to be routed. One solution is to remove the board, pass the cable through and install the board again but that is inconvenient. By tilting and rotating I was able to pass the connector of the cable without removing the switchboard. Thanks to the cutouts on the PSU shroud the cabling at the bottom side of the motherboard is of no concern in the Thermaltake Level 20 MT ARGB. The rear fan having 3-pin power cable was connected to the motherboard’s fan header. From the front side, I did not have issues as such except that of mentioned above but from the backside, cable management is one heck of a challenge with the Thermaltake Level 20 MT ARGB. I don’t know why they have skipped on this aspect but in case you are going to use extension sleeved cables or full length sleeved cables there is literally no space to work on the cable management in the Thermaltake Level 20 MT ARGB. To highlight this aspect, I have bundled the cables in the middle of the frame to form a bulk. Since there is no space on the panel as well, it was not closing properly and it was forced to fit in with the middle portion showing off the pressure coming from the bulk of the cables. The Noctua NH-U12A has a height of 158mm. With this cooler installed, I am getting an impression that anything above 165mm or so might actually touch the TG panel though I could not check it but visually the feeling is that 170mm might be a tight fit. Other than that, there is no issue as such that I have faced. Here are some of the pictures that I have taken of the build:

Testing

Next up is the thermal testing using the same configuration as mentioned above. Here are some key points regarding the testing:

  • There is no user control over the speed of the front fans.
  • The rear fan was set to run at 100% of the speed.
  • No other fan was used to ensure the testing of the chassis in stock configuration.
  • AIDA64 was used to stress the CPU and the Graphics Card at a time.
  • A stress test was run for 30 minutes before taking temperature readings.
  • Minimum of 30 minutes of idling time was ensured between both testings.
  • The thermal testing is conducted with and without the front panel to see how much airflow restricted this design is and that if the front fans are powerful enough to cope with the airflow restriction.
  • Ambient Temperature was 33°C during the testing.
  • Intel i7 8700k was boosting to 4.7GHz with Asus Enhancement mode on.
  • Average of all cores’ maximum temperature readings were taken for the graph.

Here is the result:

As can be seen, there is a difference of whopping 8°C with the front panel on as compared to the front panel off. This is showing that the front panel has restricted airflow and that the front fans don’t have adequate static pressure to cope with the restriction. However, the graphics card temperature was fine in both scenarios.

RGB Lighting

With the chassis design discussed at length, it is time to take a look at the RGB lighting solution. In order to control the lighting effects of the 3x 120mm ARGB fans on the front, we have a controller button located on the top I/O panel. It is pertinent to mention that the lighting can be turned off altogether, which is actually one of the modes now. We have total of 27 illumination modes on these fans:

  • Mode 1: Wave Mode
  • Mode 2: Flow Mode
  • Mode 3: RGB Lighting Single Color
  • Mode 4~10: Radar Mode with Red, Yellow, Green, Cyan, Blue, White, Purple colors
  • Mode 11~18: Breathe Mode with Red, Yellow, Green, Cyan, Blue, White, Purple colors
  • Mode 19: Full lighted Mode
  • Mode 20~26: Single Color with Red, Yellow, Green, Cyan, Blue, White, Purple colors
  • Mode 27: Light Off

Please, note that Thermaltake is using the 6-pin proprietary connector on these fans. Hence, the user has no control over the speed of these fans.

Here are some pics for your eye pleasure.

 

Conclusion

The Thermaltake Level 20 MT ARGB is a mid-tower having a dimension of 455x204x71mm with a net weight of 6.75KG. Its main frame is made of SPCC material and it features two TG panels as well. The exterior and interior are finished in black color. It has 7x PCIe slots. The CPU Cooler’s height clearance is 170mm. The supported length for the graphics card without radiator on the right side (vented side) is 366mm. The maximum supported length for the PSU is 170mm. In terms of the storage department, this chassis can hold a maximum of 4 2.5” drives at a moment or 2x 2.5” and 2x 3.5” drives or a combination thereof. The drive cage has two caddies that could support either 3.5” or 2.5” drives. Plus we have two 2.5” brackets in addition to the drive cage. The caddies are not tool-less. In terms of the cooling department, the Thermaltake Level 20 MT ARGB can house up to 3x 120mm fans on the front, 1x 120mm fan on the rear, 2x 120mm fans on the bottom, 2x 120/140mm fans on the top and 2x 120mm fans on the right side. Please, note that 140mm fans are only supported up top. In terms of the radiator support, the front side can house up to 360mm radiator, the right side can house up to 240 mm and the rear can house 120mm radiator (slim one). The Thermaltake Level 20 MT ARGB supports motherboard up to Standard ATX size.

The real showcase of the Thermaltake Level 20 MT ARGB are the 2x 4mm thick Tempered Glass panels (front and side) and 3x 120mm ARGB fans on the front (pre-installed). The front panel has a tempered glass which sits that well in the overall symmetry of the design. The sides of the panel are angular and curvy and they are finished to mimic the brushed aluminum though they are still plastic. They have a silver color on them. The tempered glass is installed using the dual sided adhesive tape on the top and at the bottom and this is my first complaint. The chassis was used after its testing in an environment where the ambient was crossing the 42°C and the glass panel fell off from the top side. It was clear the top side adhesive tape has given up. This could well be due to the high environmental temperatures as well as poor quality of the tape. The glass panel is installed in an offset design as the vented portion on the right side of the panel has slightly more width as compared to the left side. Surprisingly, these already narrow vented areas are the only ones on the front that have a dust filter on their back. There is like a 3mm or less gap between the glass panel the 3x 120mm ARGB fans that come preinstalled. Leaving or exposing an effective area of above 360mm un-filtered as there is no dust filter between the glass panel and the fans. This is my second complaint. The fans don’t seem to have high static pressure as our thermal testing has concluded hence other than giving the pleasant looks, these might not be enough for proper ventilation particularly if you are overclocking. Yet, another complaint!

The motherboard tray has no flex and overall build quality is good. There are proper cutouts on the top and on the right side though none of them has rubber grommet. There are 7x PCIe slots with vented removable covers which are not secured using thumb screws so you would need a screwdriver. All standoffs are pre-installed to my liking. There is a honeycomb style vented area on the right side of the motherboard tray. It has mounting positions for up to 2x 120mm size fans or radiator up to 240mm. There is also a vented portion on the back side panel facing the honeycomb vented area. It has a magnetic dust filter to my liking. The user can use this area for additional air intake or exhaust as per the configuration and requirement. The top panel has a magnetic dust filter as well as covering the mounting area for up to 2x 120/140mm fans. Please, note that there is a displacement of less than 27mm from the top of the chassis to the top side of the motherboard making it impossible to install any radiator there.

The Thermaltake Level 20 MT ARGB has a full-length PSU Shroud with a vented portion on the top side. This vented portion can house up to 2x 120mm fans though they don’t have access to any fresh air intake location due to close off design at the bottom. The PSU mount has a removable dust filter at the bottom. While taking it off is an easy job, the same is not true for its installation. The drive cage is removable as it is secured using 4x screws at the bottom and 4x screws on the top of the PSU shroud. The far right side of the shroud’s top has a 2.5” drive bracket secured using a thumb screw. There is a gap of approximately 57mm between the front side and the PSU shroud for ease of AIO/Radiator installation.

The backside of the chassis has less than 12mm or so space for the cable management and since there is no indent or inset in the side panel either there is literally little to less space for the cable management and it can be further inconvenient if the user is going to use sleeved cables (full length or extension) as bulk of the cables that need to be tucked between the PSU and the drive cage might not have enough space there. Either the user would be forced to remove the drive cage or just use the “as fit in” scenario. There are plenty of cable tie points on the back. There is an RGB switch board installed on the top left side of the frame which also covers the certain top portion of the cutout from where the 24-pin ATX cable is to be routed making it cumbersome to pass the cable with the board installed. The front 3x 120mm ARGB fans are connected to this board using proprietary 6-pin cable connectors. There is also a 3-pin connector though our sample did not have a rear fan connected to it. The users can’t control the speed of the front mounted 3x fans. The board draws power using the SATA cable. The I/O panel on the top has 2x audio jacks, 2x USB 3.0 ports, power, reset and RGB buttons as well as LED indicator.

The fans on the front feature addressable RGB lighting and this chassis comes with 27 illumination modes. These modes can be controlled using the RGB switch located on the top I/O panel. The plus here is that this RGB lighting can be synced with the leading motherboards’ onboard lighting solution from various manufacturers like Asus AURA Sync, MSI Mystic Lithing, Gigabyte RGB Fusion, ASRock Polymer, etc. Thermaltake has bundled two RGB sync cables just for that. Reason for two is that the Gigabyte motherboards are using 4-pin format for the addressable RGB headers and Thermaltake has kept that in mind. Make sure to connect the cable to the 5V RGB headers not 12V RGB headers on the motherboard if going the route of syncing RGB lighting of the chassis with the motherboard.

Assembling a system inside the Thermaltake Level 20 MT ARGB is an easy job and should not take more time. Please check our Test build section for installation notes and overall experience. The Thermaltake Level 20 MT ARGB is listed at Rs.11,500/- at Shing [at the time of the review] making it budget friendly mid-tower chassis that comes with 2x 4mm tempered glass panels and 3x 120mm ARGB fans as well as fourth non-RGB fan on the rear, it is clear that price is not a bargain but possibly the best price given the totality of the features. Though there are multiple of design constraints and drawbacks including the restricted airflow at the front, the Thermaltake Level 20 MT ARGB is among the viable options out there in the market. The restricted airflow can be overcome by utilizing the right side vented portion as an air intake. I would highly suggest using this area for additional air intake or using a combination of fans on the front and the right side for optimal airflow.

We are thankful to the Thermaltake for giving us the opportunity to review their Level 20 MT ARGB PC Chassis.