The Microsoft HoloLens are awesome augmented reality goggles that can be found in its developer version at a price tag of $3,000, but as regards its commercial version, it will not be available in the short term. Microsoft’s Alex Kipman (the Kinect software developer) said at a recent TED Conference in Vancouver, that the company is determined not to repeat the mistakes they made ​​with Kinect.

Microsoft will not release its HoloLens until “the world is ready”

Microsoft-HoloLens

Kinect is (or perhaps was) a motion control system originally designed for the Xbox 360 that failed miserably for several reasons, the most prominent was the arrival of crappy games as those games were not meeting with the promised offers from the company side. With the Xbox One same was repeated, except that this time the sale was mandatory jointly with putting excuse of Kinect with the console, but such a combination meant losing sales of console because an overwhelming majority was not interested in paying the extra cost of Kinect.

Now we could say that this is the third and last chance for Microsoft, but with  HoloLens, the product might be ready for promised time, but there will need to be a substantial base of worthwhile software in place as well.

“If a consumer bought it today, they would have 12 things to do with it,” Kipman said. “And they would say ‘Cool, I bought a $3,000 product that I can do 12 things with and now it is collecting dust.’”

“When I feel the world is ready, then we will allow normal people to buy it,” he said. “It could be as soon as we say ‘yes,’ and it could be as long as a ‘very long time.’”

If you are complaining that the Oculus Rift or HTC Vive Preview are expensive, then it is obvious that this is a product which would be four times more expensive and also for now there are not enough software to support its purchase. On the other side Oculus Rift and HTC Vive already have lots of games that can take the advantage of its capabilities as well as multimedia content (recording videos in 360-degrees).

“If a consumer bought it today, they would have 12 things to do with it,” Kipman said. “And they would say ‘Cool, I bought a $3,000 product that I can do 12 things with and now it is collecting dust.’”

“When I feel the world is ready, then we will allow normal people to buy it,” he said. “It could be as soon as we say ‘yes,’ and it could be as long as a ‘very long time.’”

Via: pcgamer.com