The relationship between mobile phones and food may be closer than many think. So much so, that for small farmers around the world a single cell has become one of the most powerful tools to produce their crops and with them, providing food for their community, says columnist Dan Glickman in ‘ National Geographic ‘.

Can Mobile Phones Eradicate Hunger In The World?

An Indian vegatable seller arranges vegatables as she speaks on a cellular phone at a roadside vegatable market in Allahabad on April 1, 2010.    Indian telecoms tycoon Sunil Bharti Mittal has finally achieved his dream of breaking into the African market with a 10.7-billion-dollar deal to buy Kuwait-based Zain's Africa assets. Bharti Airtel, the top mobile operator in India, announced late March 29,that it had sealed the agreement to buy most of Zain's African assets.    AFP PHOTO/Diptendu DUTTA (Photo credit should read DIPTENDU DUTTA/AFP/Getty Images)

An Indian vegatable seller arranges vegatables as she speaks on a cellular phone at a roadside vegatable market in Allahabad on April 1, 2010.

According to him farmers are using mobile technology to share crucial information on climate, rainfall and market demand, in addition to the prices of seeds, which empowers millions of them to grow more food just as the world most in need.

According to him “about half of the 805 million chronically hungry people in the world are small rural producers” without access to adequate resources and training, “they are unable to put food on the table for themselves and their families”. The writer argues that “the drought, disease, pests or post-harvest contamination” are the main reasons why spoil their crops.

Not surprisingly, the mobile platform iCow farmers send text messages with tips on pest prevention of infection in cattle and selection of certain types of grass to feed the cows, remember columnist. Other applications may provide from weather forecasts to fertilizer prices.

“Technology alone will not rid the world of hunger”

Columnist emphasizes that all agricultural advantages that a cell can provide are useless for the “millions of farmers who are illiterate” and stresses that gender inequality may also influence its ineffectiveness. They keep technology such as cell phones, out of reach of millions of women farmers worldwide, despite representing approximately 43% of the agricultural labor force in developing countries, Glickman notes.